Women Artists and Their Recognition by Museums and Culture

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom Thursday, June 27

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom Thursday, June 27

Fenimore Art Museum Presents Live Zoom Discussions on the Topic of Women Artists and Their Recognition by Museums and Culture

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom

Three Part Series • Thursdays: May 23, June 27, July 25 • 7:00pm • Free • Registration Required

COOPERSTOWN, NY — Fenimore Art Museum presents a three-part, once-monthly series of live discussions via Zoom on the topic of women artists and their recognition by museums and culture today. This series takes stories from the struggles of generations of women artists and turns them into inspiring lessons for current and future generations. The series is presented in conjunction with the museum’s current exhibition As They Saw It: Women Artists Then & Now, on view through September 2, 2024. The live discussions take place on Thursdays: May 23, June 27, and July 25 at 7:00pm and are conducted via Zoom.

The program is free. Registration is required. Reserve a spot for one or all the tours at FenimoreArt.org through the website’s event calendar. If you value this type of program, please consider a donation of $10 or more to help fund future programs. Zoom is required to view the lecture. A link and passcode will be provided to all registrants 24 hours prior to the lecture via e-mail. See the full schedule and tour descriptions at FenimoreArt.org.

Generous support for this project provided by Art Bridges. As They Saw It is one in a series of American art exhibitions organized through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, as part of the Art Bridges Initiative.

SERIES SCHEDULE AND DESCRIPTIONS:

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom (part 1) • Thursday, May 23, 2024 • 7:00pm

A discussion on the As They Saw It: Women Artists Then & Now featuring the exhibition curators: Martina Tanga, Curatorial Research and Interpretation Associate, MFA Boston; Maggie North, Art Historian and Curator, Springfield Museums; and Ann Cannon and Julia Madore, Associate Curators at Fenimore Art Museum.

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom (part 2) • Thursday, June 27, 2024 • 7:00pm

A discussion on the exhibition As They Saw It: Women Artists Then & Now featuring three of the artists included in the exhibition: Kyra Hicks, a quilter, author, and quilt historian specializing in creating story quilts with themes related to race, politics, family, and religion; Carla Hemlock, a Mohawk textile and mixed media artist who explores Native North American women’s histories and contemporary lives; and Ambreen Butt, a Pakistani-American artist trained in traditional Indian and Persian miniature painting who reimagines the genre to feature contemporary female protagonists and political subject matter.

The Fight for Recognition: A Series of Discussions via Zoom (part 3) • Thursday, July 25, 2024 • 7:00pm

A discussion on the exhibition As They Saw It: Women Artists Then & Now featuring art historians and critics specializing in women’s art: Kiara Hill, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History at Portland State University, focusing on Black Women Artists, Black Feminist Art, and Black Contemporary Art; Emily Francisco, Curatorial Associate for the Collection, Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Gallery of Art, and Ph.D. candidate in American Art at the University of Delaware; and Jessica Shearer, editor, writer, and critic for Boston Art Review with an interest in narratives of gender, community, and dislocation.

About Fenimore Art Museum

Fenimore Art Museum, located on the shores of Otsego Lake—James Fenimore Cooper’s “Glimmerglass”—in historic Cooperstown, New York, features a wide-ranging collection of American art including folk art; important American 18th- and 19th-century landscape, genre, and portrait paintings; more than 125,000 historic photographs representing the technical developments made in photography and providing extensive visual documentation of the region’s unique history; and the renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art comprised of nearly 900 art objects representative of a broad geographic range of North American Indian cultures, from the Northwest Coast, Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, Great Lakes, and Prairie regions. Visit FenimoreArt.org.

About Art Bridges Foundation

Art Bridges Foundation is the vision of philanthropist and arts patron Alice Walton. The mission of Art Bridges is to expand access to American art in all regions across the United States. Founded in 2017, Art Bridges creates and supports programs that bring outstanding works of American art out of storage and into communities. Art Bridges partners with a growing network of more than 230 museums to provide financial and strategic support for exhibition development, loans from the Art Bridges Permanent Collection, and programs designed to educate, inspire, and deepen engagement with local audiences. The Art Bridges Permanent Collection represents an expanding vision of American art from the 19th century to present day and encompasses multiple media and voices. For more information, visit artbridgesfoundation.org.